How to Save Money by Eliminating Debt


debtIs one of your goals to improve your financial health? If you want to save more money, the first step is getting out of debt. There are many different methods about how to best manage and eliminate debt, and the important thing is to find the one that works for your lifestyle. The best method for eliminating debt is the one you can actually stick to for a long period of time.

The easiest way to start is to do a little research to learn about the different types of debt, consolidation and payoff strategies, and budgeting methods. Once you have a good understanding of the options, you can choose the one that’s the right fit for you. Here are some possible strategies for reducing your debt, saving more, and improving your overall financial situation.

Understand Your Personal Debt

If you are like most people, you have a combination of “good” and “bad” debt. Good debt refers to secured debt where there is a reasonable expectation of a return on investment. A mortgage is generally considered good debt. Credit card balances are generally considered bad debt because the interest rates are extremely high and the debt is unsecured. Before you come up with a plan to pay off your debt, look at your overall financial situation and determine how much good and bad debt you have. It’s usually best to pay off the bad debt first.

Stop Overspending

Before you can start paying off your debt in earnest, you may need to rein in your spending habits. For some people, this isn’t possible. If all your monthly spending is truly necessary (such as utility bills, school tuition, mortgage payments, and food), then you may not be able to change it. But most people have at least a few unnecessary expenses every month, such as eating out, daily lattes, or magazine subscriptions. Take a good look at your spending and find any areas where you can cut back until you get your debt under control.

Prioritize the Payoff Strategy

Once you have a good understanding of all your debt and have cut back on unnecessary spending, you should prioritize which debts you want to pay off first. There are several different theories about whether you should pay off “bad” debt first, or the debt with the highest interest rate, or the one with the largest balance, or prioritize according to any number of other aspects. You should choose the method that makes the most sense to you and the one you feel you’ll be the most motivated to achieve.

Create a Plan

Now that you know which debts you want to pay off first, it’s time to make a plan. Budgeting is an important part of the plan, so you know exactly how much of your income you can put towards debt repayment and how much you need to keep for living expenses. Some people find that using an automatic payment plan works well for actually sticking to the payoff plan.

Consider Refinancing

One option for consolidating debt in order to reduce interest payments is to refinance your mortgage. The options for refinancing depend on the current state of the economy, your equity in your home, your credit score, and many other factors. Refinancing is a very smart financial move for some people. It’s a good idea to read about how a refinancing plan works, and if possible talk with a financial adviser or another expert to determine if it’s the right move for you.

Research a Personal Loan

One way to consolidate your debt and start rebuilding your credit is to secure a personal loan. While this type of loan can be used for many things, one particularly good use is to pay off high-interest credit card balances. There are many personal loan providers so it’s important to use a loan comparison tool to figure out which one is the right fit for your situation. Once you know a bit about the providers, terms, and options, you can apply for your loan and get those credit cards paid off.

One of the best ways to save money and improve your financial situation is to get rid of your personal debt as much possible. Paying off debt can be a complex process, so the best way to start is through careful research and planning, and then staying with your plan until you pay off your loans.

Written by Jon the Saver

This post was written by yours truly, Jon Elder. My mission is to help you succeed in your personal finance life. Join me on the journey to financial freedom! You can subscribe through RSS FEED or EMAIL updates. You can also find me on TWITTER
and FACEBOOK
. Happy investing 🙂

Jon the Saver

This post was written by yours truly, Jon Elder. My mission is to help you succeed in your personal finance life. Join me on the journey to financial freedom! You can subscribe through RSS FEED or EMAIL updates. You can also find me on TWITTER and FACEBOOK . Happy investing 🙂

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